Minorities in Trump's America

Living in Trump's America has been hard, especially for Minorities.

Donald Trump was elected into office on Nov. 8, 2016 . That night was filled with anger, but also sadness. Trump in office meant everything would change for minorities living in America. People started acting differently toward minorities, but it ended up being worst for some than others.

 Elizabeth Monico

Elizabeth Monico

“As a minority it’s always been a struggle, but now that Trump is in office, I wouldn't say people are more racist, I just think people are less afraid to show it. When we were younger, racism was something that was more subtle. People were still racist, but for the most part they were racist in private. But with the president we have now, racists are getting the idea that it’s okay that they’re racist. It’s like “the president's fucked up so I can be too,” that’s what scared me most, white people know that they can get away with anything now. I think the scariest thing about being hispanic/latino specifically is watching people in my community being deported at such high rates now. It makes you afraid because there is a chance you’ll lose some people around you. On top of that, I feel like as a minority I have to walk on eggshells to avoid pissing off white people because I know if they wanted to, they could tell a cop anything they want and they’ll believe them. I’ve witnessed this firsthand. You can do nothing wrong, but at the end of the day a white person will still have the power to ruin your life.”

 

“Not only am I a minority but I’m placed in the category of people Trump is trying to get rid of. Since Trump got voted into office, I had multiple experiences with a classmate who always tweeted about how Muslims are terrorists and that Trump was right about ‘us’. Not only did he tweet this but he would also say comments in class about how all Muslims are apart of ISIS. This would cause a debate between us mainly because he was constantly try to quote something in the Qur’an but completely twist the meaning.”

 

 Reema Milbes

Reema Milbes

 
 Emmanuel Huntspon

Emmanuel Huntspon

“So from a race perspective yes, obviously there’s racism everywhere but I do stress at least once a day about like someone calling me out at work or like just even being in public for no specific reason. But at the same time I’m comforted by the fact that I’m not alone and other minorities understand the problem of discrimination cause we all have to deal with it. Specifically with Trump being elected I do stress more situations of me getting killed just because I’m black but I try to hold my faith that California won’t be that state to be killers like that. As a LGBT boy it’s even worst because people still don’t 100% accept gay people so I always get looks, but mainly from white guys I reject to go on dates or hook up with they’ll get extremely racist and say things like ‘nigga’ or ‘nigger’ or you’re nothing anyways,”

 
 Mariah Thomas, Photography.

Mariah Thomas, Photography.

"Living as a biracial minority in Trumps America is to be frank- fucking scary, I’m constantly hearing ignorant remarks about being Mexican or being black and about my parents having me. When I say ‘Ohh I’m also white,” I’m disregarded as if I'm not “white” enough? And don’t get me wrong, ignorance, and racism doesn’t have a color. For example, what about when I went to Denver with my Mexican side of my family and when I walked into a store was asked if we just went to go eat Mexican food because it smells like “Mexican” it doesn’t make any sense. Or if I’m with my black side of my family, which I can’t even get into because I just shake with anger thinking about how RUDE people are to us. For my black side we are all different colors, and as of more recent times-shocker we have noticed more people being ballsier. We are used to the looks, but having actually hear ‘I bet you that they all have different dads/moms’ why are we stereotyped like this? Since Trump became president, I’ve realized how many people are finally showing their true colors, and sadly this is only the beginning. I know my family and I will continue to overcome this together, I just wish we could all overcome as one. Which is how America was supposed to be ‘liberty and justice for all’ and one day, I hope we can actually achieve this.”

 
 Sabriah Johnwell, Culinary Arts.

Sabriah Johnwell, Culinary Arts.

“ Living in Trump’s America, I have realized who my real friends are. After the election, a few of my white friends started being fake and judging my religion and color. They used degrading and derogative terms towards me. I was called a “nigger’ and a ‘terrorist.’ In this day and age, people still believe that Muslims are affiliated with terrorist groups, like ISIS. But they ever knew what my religion was about they would know that my religion is a religion of peace. I have always been proud of myself but being degraded made me want to become someone else. I wanted to being a part of be majority just so that I didn’t feel ashamed to be apart of a minority group. I realized that I will never be accepted by the racist people who come into my life, I will never try to change myself to be liked by them. Trump promised to Make America Great Again, but all he did was Make America Hate Again. I will continue to fight for people who feel like they don’t have a voice and overcome the hate we receive,"

I often think about what one of my friends told me, "I disregarded my culture to turn myself more into the majority," People are losing themselves and who they are living in Trump's America. Losing their culture, history and color to become someone we are not. We as Americans can not conform to Trump's idealistic ways of how America should be. When he says "Make America Great Again," he is truly saying, "Make America White Again,"